Ancient Greek Interior Design

This is an important article that will help you to understand the Ancient Greek Interior Design.

Ancient Greek Interior Structure

Both marble palaces and whitewashed stone houses are considered “ancient architecture” styles in Greek history. Whether it’s a palace or a whitewashed cliff dwelling, both styles of architecture are made from stone building materials. Even the most modest Greek home was designed with an open-air terrace and/or patio. The most highly sought real estate included parcels that allowed a homeowner to build his residence with multiple facades facing south to capture maximum amounts of sunlight. Regardless of a home’s size, ancient Greek interior design was centered around the family’s hearth, usually the first feature added to the interior after the shell was built.

Walls, Floors and Other Features

Elaborate stone cuttings and mortar were used to create stone areas and paths on the ground floors of Greek homes, patios and terraces. Dwellings with a second story were fitted with wood floors, both for ease of installation and to counter the weight issue. Interior walls may feature beautiful murals if a homeowner had a creative bent or knew of an artisan willing to undertake the job. Openings leading from room to room in the typical ancient Greek home were frequently curved; it was unusual for a house to have interior doors. Curved roofs, typical of architecture in the Mediterranean region, are commonplace. Not every home had a solid front door.

Interior Rooms

In ancient Greece, it wasn’t unusual for men and women to sleep apart in dormitory-like wings, particularly if a family was large. Washing areas were as important in a floor plan as the hearth. If a homeowner was wealthy enough to afford clay pipes to bring water from aqueducts, the family could bathe with fresh running water. Otherwise, women collected water from wells, brought it to the washroom and carried the dirty water back out. Hand-loomed textile rugs hung from walls and covered floors, adding touches of color to individual rooms. Handcrafted curtains, usually embroidered with all sorts of colorful designs by the household’s women, hung over windows as well.

Ancient Greek Furnishings

Greek furniture makers followed Egyptian design lines when crafting furnishings, and materials didn’t differ much, either. Oak, cedar, olive, boxwood, maple and ebony woods in the hands of skillful Greek carpenters became chairs, tables, couches, stools and beds. Natural grasses, vegetation and leather were used to weave thick chair and bed mats. Greek carpenters added distinct ornamentation to furniture, including copper, bronze and iron embellishments. Wood veneer trim also provided a popular way to decorate furniture in ancient Greece.

Sources : 

http://www.ehow.com/info_8602260_ancient-greek-interior-design.html

http://www.ehow.com/list_6697192_greek-style-decorating-ideas.html

Classical Civilizations : Greece

The name of God the Merciful

History of Interior Design & Architecture

Second Lecture  – Classical Civilizations : Greece

The Types of buildings that used to build in The civilization of ancient Greece are : Ancient Greek theater, Acropolis, Agora, Stoa, and List of Ancient Greek temples.

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Exterior view and reconstruction of the interior of the Parthenon, Athens, Greece, 447–432 B.C.E.

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The interior of the stoa of Attalos in the agora of Athens, Greece, c. 150 B.C.E.

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Ancient Greek plan House of Colline Delos

Ancient Greek architecture is best known from its temples. Most Ancient Greek temples were rectangular, and were approximately twice as long as they were wide.

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Plans of Ancient Greek Temples

Orders 

Stylistically, Ancient Greek architecture is divided into three “orders” : the Doric Order, the Ionic Order and the Corinthian Order, the names reflecting their origins.

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Greek orders of architecture.

The Doric order (left), the style used at the Parthenon in Athens, is austere and sturdily proportioned, its fluted column having no base and a simple capital. The column of the Ionic order (center) has a capital with two prominent spiral volutes, more vertical flutes and a greater ratio of height to diameter. The capital of the Corinthian (right), the most elaborate of the Greek orders, is ornamented with acanthus leaves and very small volutes. Given the same diameter, a Corinthian column would be the tallest of the three.

The Doric Order : It uses a column with no base that rises from the top of a three-stepped platform called (Stylobate). Its simple capital made up of  a round (Echinus) with a square block called (Abacus) above.

The Ionic Order : It uses a column taller and thinner in proportion than the Doric. It is mostly identified by its capital with its twin scroll-form  called Volutes.

The Corinthian Order : It is the most ornate of the three orders, using : Small Volutes at the corners of the column capital. Carved forms of Acanthus leaves ringing the lower part of the capital. It was widely used in Roman times. It has been a favorite of later users of Classical  architectural detail.

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Architectural elements of the Doric Order showing simple curved echinus of capital

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Capital of the Ionic Order showing volutes and ornamented echinus

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Capital of the Corinthian Order showing foliate decoration and vertical volutes.

My Sketches

photo photo_1 photo_4 photo_3 photo_5 photo_2 photo_6

Sources :

1- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Greece

2- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek_architecture

3- http://www.britishmuseum.org/about_us/departments/greece_and_rome.aspx

Prehistory to Early Civilizations

The name of God the Merciful

History of Interior Design & Architecture

First Lecture  – Prehistory to Early Civilizations

Cave Art : Interiors of Prehistoric Man

According to ancient art history and findings of prehistoric cave art, the Cro-Magnon people; the first civilized ancestors of the modern European, were supposed to have made their entry into Europe through Africa or Asia, about 25 millenniums ago.

Prehistoric Cave Art

Prehistoric art records of these groups of people (the cave men) showed that their sketches were boldly and accurately drawn with line drawings and crude paintings, using roots and plants; and these adorned the ceilings and walls of their caves and their rudimentary hand tools. Drawings were representations of plants, animals and human forms, skills that must have demanded some form of training and high mental concentration.

The earliest drawings were outlines of their chosen forms only, and were devoid of any details or niceties. Later, simple perspectives and foreshortening (drawings that appeared shorter than reality, in order to create a 3 dimensional effect) evolved, and there is even some evidence of compositions of form groupings showing for example, a group of animals ‘on the move’.

The purpose of the prehistoric cave art drawings is still unclear, but they must have possessed some decorative value. Probably they were meant to ‘pretty up‘ their enclaves, have some religious significance, or serve as lucky ‘charms‘ for a bountiful hunting expedition.

Their clay sculptures representing the human form was limited to the depiction of the female. Conventionalism, rather than realism is clearly indicated. For example, the arms, head and feet were slightly indicated, or, in some cases, totally omitted, but the human reproductive parts were greatly elaborated, suggesting divine appeals for fertility and progeny.

Prehistoric Art History

Prehistoric art works, as indicated by the discoveries of their creations, can be aptly described as preceding history, or prehistory. It has been suggested that art creations of the cave man may have commenced during a period of thousands of years, while man evolved from the animal state to the human state.

This has sparked the belief that the expression of creativity is instinctive in humans, and therefore the origin of the art of ‘interior design’ goes way back to the dawn of human civilization, and therefore is an integral part of human needs.

Videos :

1- Cave Paintings : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pO7r1QmRjSo

2- THE DAWN OF ART : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZrZxyRBAlM

3- Prehistoric Art, Part One by Victoria Taylor-Gore : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4JiJdG4UOE

4- From human prehistory to the earliest civilizations :

 http://prezi.com/sxosigmoj6l8/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy&rc=ex0share

Photos : 

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The River Valley Civilizations

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Lascaux Cave Art – 16,000 years old

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Lascaux Cave, France  Photograph by Sisse Brimberg

Containing some 600 paintings, Lascaux Cave in France’s Dordogne River Valley is home to perhaps the world’s most incredible array of Upper Paleolithic art. Prehistoric artists created the depictions of bulls and other animals on the cave’s calcite walls more than 17,000 years ago. The cave and its artwork was discovered by a group of teenagers in 1940.

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Ancient Egypt Tools : Objects from Daily Life (new axehead)

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Ancient Egypt Tools, Aterian Industry

The Aterian industry is a name given by archaeologists to a type of stone tool manufacturing dating to the Middle Stone Age (or Middle Palaeolithic) derived from the Mousterian culture in the region around the Atlas Mountains and the northern Sahara, it refers the site of Bir el Ater, south of Annaba. The industry was probably created by modern humans (Homo sapiens), albeit of an early type, as shown by the few skeletal remains known so far from sites on the Moroccan Atlantic coast extending to Egypt.

My Sketches

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Sources :

1- http://artsofthetimes.hubpages.com/hub/prehistory-periods-cave-art-of-prehistoric-man

2- http://www.mylearning.org/ancient-egyptians-objects-from-daily-life/p-3509/

3- http://www.weapons-universe.com/Swords/Bronze_Age_Weapons.shtml

4- http://www.crystalinks.com/egypthistory.html

5- http://www.crystalinks.com/egypthistory.html

6- http://www.rivervalleycivilizations.com/

7- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lascaux

8- http://www.nationalgeographic.com/